Birds and bees

My hummingbird picture prompted Lyle Anderson to share a few of the pictures he has taken of hummers recently.

"I have two hummingbird feeders in the backyard and it’s very easy to take pictures of hummers as they get used to people right away," Lyle writes. "It’s fun to watch them as they are so aggressive and chase each other so much that I wonder how they can gain anything, but  guess they must."

Check out these beauties:

 

And now I have a related question for you, dear readers. My hummingbird feeders are being overrun by bees. The hummingbird still gets its share, but between the hummer and the bees, it’s hard to keep enough nectar in the feeders. The bees are lethargic and certainly not aggressive. But I’d still rather not have so many next to the house.

Can anyone suggest how I can keep the hummingbird(s) coming but discourage the bees?

Your answers, pictures, observations eagerly anticipated here: jlundy@duluthnews.com.

 

3 thoughts on “Birds and bees

  1. John, I found the best hummingbird feeder for keeping the bees away is the kind that you have pictured at the top of your most recent blog, instead of the kind where you fill up the feeder and then turn it upside down. With the former, the nectar is out of reach of the bees as compared with the latter, where the nectar is right at the end of the feeding tube and within reach of the bees or hornets.

  2. To deal with the bee issue, we have hung a separate feeder next to it filled with beer, which keeps them from touching the hummer feeder for the most part.

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