Hummers

Jeanette Lang passed along the hummingbird migration link, and it shows an early advance of the hummers that seems astonishing to me. For example, the first hummingbird of the season was reported today … in the Upper Peninsula. There also have been scattered sighting as far north as central Wisconsin and southern Minnesota. I don’t think the old rule about waiting until Mother’s Day to put out hummingbird feeders in Duluth is going to work this year.
You can see for yourself, and check as often as you like, here:

I didn’t see any hummingbirds during a road trip today, but I thought I saw a red-winged blackbird. It was in a marshy area off Highway 2 just north of Proctor.

Your bird news and photos eagerly received at: jlundy@duluthnews.com.

10 thoughts on “Hummers

  1. I live quite a bit south of you (in Todd county) and we are seeing our first warblers today (a Yellow-rumped). No Hummingbirds yet but I cannot imagine what they would be getting their nectar from yet.

  2. I live in Proctor and a marshy area that abuts my property has been loaded for 3 weeks with Redwing Blackbirds who are starting to nest. Each day my trees and feeders are filled with scores of Redwings, Starlings and Grackles all chattering at the same time.

    • The first loon made his appearance on tues march 26th the earliest we have ever seen since 1980. Red wing blackbirds are at the feeders along with others. But no hummers yet. We are located near Holyoke, Mn just south of Duluth.

  3. Could the hummers moving North so soon eat nectar from the flowering red maples and/or caulkins from the birches? I know they also eat very small insects.
    Hey Chuck715 — what do your red and yellow hummers eat? :)
    Great Blue Herons arrived on their nest site this afternoon, and I finally heard a loon on Lake Ahmeek.

  4. No hummers yet (just south of Mille Lacs) but had over a dozen robins in mid February in the back yard, even collecting leaves. Redwings started to appear shortly after and the early morning Cardinal songs have been loud for most of March. Strange incident in our front yard this morning – a bunch of grackles invaded our birdfeeders (not unusual) and then we heard a thump on the front window as the grackles flew away…except one. It was dragged across the yard by a coopers hawk that sat on it for several minutes then flew away with it. Never saw anything like that before…

    • I stand corrected. After further reference, it was definitely a Northern Goshawk and not a Cooper’s Hawk that took down the grackle.

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